gunsandposes:

FUJI FLYER — Ingenious Swiss daredevil Yves “Jetman” Rossy rockets around Mount Fuji in Japan, demonstrating the eight-foot-wide, jet-powered, carbon-fiber wing machine he invented to achieve his dream of flying. Mission accomplished, me thinks. Watch the video here.

(Source: humanoidhistory)

we-are-star-stuff:

A blind british man has had his sight restored after pioneering surgery that involved implanting one of his teeth into his eye.
Ian Tibbetts, 43, who first damaged his eye in an industrial accident when scrap metal ripped his cornea in six places, had his sight restored by the radical operation, chronicled in the new BBC documentary The Day I Got My Sight Back.
The surgery allowed Mr Tibbetts to see his four-year-old twin sons, Callum and Ryan, for the first time, a moment he describes as “ecstasy”.
The procedure, called osteo-odonto-keratoprothesis, or OOKP, was conducted by ophthalmic surgeon Christopher Liu at the Sussex Eye Hospital in Brighton, Sussex. Mr Tibbetts and his wife Alex agreed to the revolutionary surgery after all other options had failed, leaving Mr Tibbetts depressed and out of work.
The complex surgery is a two-part procedure. First, the tooth and part of the jaw are removed, and a lens is inserted into the tooth using a drill. The tooth and lens are then implanted under the eye socket. After a few months, once the tooth has grown tissues and developed a blood supply, comes the second step: part of the cornea is sliced open and removed and the tooth is stitched into the eye socket. Since the tooth is the patient’s own tissue, the body does not reject it.
"The tooth is like a picture frame which holds this tiny plastic lens" documentary maker Sally George told the BBC.
After the bandages came off, Mr Tibbetts’ sight gradually returned, and he saw his sons’ faces for the first time.
"I just cried, gave them a big hug and a kiss. They were totally different than what I’d pictured in my mind" he said.
"They were just shapes. I couldn’t make them out. I had to actually learn to tell them apart by their voices. I could tell whichever one it was by the way they spoke and sometimes by how quickly they moved. I had a picture in my head of what they looked like but they were better. I’m a bit biased there."
Now, Mr Tibbetts’ vision is now about 40 per cent, and although at first strangers stared at his new eye - which is pink, with a black pupil, he no longer is bothered by the attention.
[via]

He had been blind for twelve years.

we-are-star-stuff:

A blind british man has had his sight restored after pioneering surgery that involved implanting one of his teeth into his eye.

Ian Tibbetts, 43, who first damaged his eye in an industrial accident when scrap metal ripped his cornea in six places, had his sight restored by the radical operation, chronicled in the new BBC documentary The Day I Got My Sight Back.

The surgery allowed Mr Tibbetts to see his four-year-old twin sons, Callum and Ryan, for the first time, a moment he describes as “ecstasy”.

The procedure, called osteo-odonto-keratoprothesis, or OOKP, was conducted by ophthalmic surgeon Christopher Liu at the Sussex Eye Hospital in Brighton, Sussex. Mr Tibbetts and his wife Alex agreed to the revolutionary surgery after all other options had failed, leaving Mr Tibbetts depressed and out of work.

The complex surgery is a two-part procedure. First, the tooth and part of the jaw are removed, and a lens is inserted into the tooth using a drill. The tooth and lens are then implanted under the eye socket. After a few months, once the tooth has grown tissues and developed a blood supply, comes the second step: part of the cornea is sliced open and removed and the tooth is stitched into the eye socket. Since the tooth is the patient’s own tissue, the body does not reject it.

"The tooth is like a picture frame which holds this tiny plastic lens" documentary maker Sally George told the BBC.

After the bandages came off, Mr Tibbetts’ sight gradually returned, and he saw his sons’ faces for the first time.

"I just cried, gave them a big hug and a kiss. They were totally different than what I’d pictured in my mind" he said.

"They were just shapes. I couldn’t make them out. I had to actually learn to tell them apart by their voices. I could tell whichever one it was by the way they spoke and sometimes by how quickly they moved. I had a picture in my head of what they looked like but they were better. I’m a bit biased there."

Now, Mr Tibbetts’ vision is now about 40 per cent, and although at first strangers stared at his new eye - which is pink, with a black pupil, he no longer is bothered by the attention.

[via]

He had been blind for twelve years.

futuretechreport:

Cortex: The 3D-Printed Cast

After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex exoskeletal cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and stylish.

The cortex cast utilizes the x-ray and 3d scan of a patient with a fracture and generates a 3d model in relation to the point of fracture.

By Jake Evill

theantidote:

Prototype Real / Digital Info Interface System

Using projection and gestures to create interactive relationship with information - video embedded below:

Fujitsu Laboratories has developed a next generation user interface which can accurately detect the users finger and what it is touching, creating an interactive touchscreen-like system, using objects in the real word.

“We think paper and many other objects could be manipulated by touching them, as with a touchscreen. This system doesn’t use any special hardware; it consists of just a device like an ordinary webcam, plus a commercial projector. Its capabilities are achieved by image processing technology.”

Using this technology, information can be imported from a document as data, by selecting the necessary parts with your finger.

More at DigInfo here

RELATED: This is very similar to a concept developed in 1991 called ‘The Digital Desk’ [link]

(via prostheticknowledge:)

Graphene is Amazing

toddsampson:

image

Graphene has been found to be a supercapacitor; a nearly unbreakable touchscreen; and now an uber-efficient filter for creating cheap, clean water from seawater.  This is pretty amazing considering graphene was only discovered about 10 years ago; and its discovery didn’t win the Nobel Prize until 2010.

Now that you can make Graphene using a standard DVD drive and etch designs that act as electrodes with a CO2 laser things are going to get really interesting.