futuretechreport:

Cortex: The 3D-Printed Cast

After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex exoskeletal cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and stylish.

The cortex cast utilizes the x-ray and 3d scan of a patient with a fracture and generates a 3d model in relation to the point of fracture.

By Jake Evill

theantidote:

Prototype Real / Digital Info Interface System

Using projection and gestures to create interactive relationship with information - video embedded below:

Fujitsu Laboratories has developed a next generation user interface which can accurately detect the users finger and what it is touching, creating an interactive touchscreen-like system, using objects in the real word.

“We think paper and many other objects could be manipulated by touching them, as with a touchscreen. This system doesn’t use any special hardware; it consists of just a device like an ordinary webcam, plus a commercial projector. Its capabilities are achieved by image processing technology.”

Using this technology, information can be imported from a document as data, by selecting the necessary parts with your finger.

More at DigInfo here

RELATED: This is very similar to a concept developed in 1991 called ‘The Digital Desk’ [link]

(via prostheticknowledge:)

Graphene is Amazing

toddsampson:

image

Graphene has been found to be a supercapacitor; a nearly unbreakable touchscreen; and now an uber-efficient filter for creating cheap, clean water from seawater.  This is pretty amazing considering graphene was only discovered about 10 years ago; and its discovery didn’t win the Nobel Prize until 2010.

Now that you can make Graphene using a standard DVD drive and etch designs that act as electrodes with a CO2 laser things are going to get really interesting.

thisistheverge:

Fujitsu’s futuristic cane does so much more than help you walk
We’d always thought the cane was a relatively mature technology — it’s very good at helping you walk around, and really can’t be improved. We were wrong. Hidden against a bright white wall inside Fujitsu’s booth at MWC was the Next Generation Cane, which is more or less what you’d get if you brought a bunch of science fiction writers into a room and asked them how to make Cane 2.0. 

This is impressive. Click through for video of a cane that can guide its owner to a destination, monitor heart rate, and let family members know where it is.

thisistheverge:

Fujitsu’s futuristic cane does so much more than help you walk

We’d always thought the cane was a relatively mature technology — it’s very good at helping you walk around, and really can’t be improved. We were wrong. Hidden against a bright white wall inside Fujitsu’s booth at MWC was the Next Generation Cane, which is more or less what you’d get if you brought a bunch of science fiction writers into a room and asked them how to make Cane 2.0. 

This is impressive. Click through for video of a cane that can guide its owner to a destination, monitor heart rate, and let family members know where it is.

MYO - Wearable Gesture Control from Thalmic Labs

(Source: youtube.com)

jstn:

Thinking about getting implanted collamer lenses. They insert a rolled up lens through a tiny incision behind your iris and it actually unfolds inside your eye, without cutting or reshaping your cornea like LASIK.

"The ICL can be removed and replaced if vision changes substantially after the procedure."

jstn:

Thinking about getting implanted collamer lenses. They insert a rolled up lens through a tiny incision behind your iris and it actually unfolds inside your eye, without cutting or reshaping your cornea like LASIK.

"The ICL can be removed and replaced if vision changes substantially after the procedure."